Posts from the ‘menswear’ Category

Never Knew I was Short and Fat

First shirt

My first shirt from S & F

My arms are too long.

They’re too long for the rest of my body.

Disproportional.

Always been a fan of asymmetry.

Maybe that’s why.

And, I’m not short.

I’m six feet tall in my bare feet.

Six one with socks and typical shoes.

I’m not fat.

One eighty-five. Maintained that weight for over thirty years.

Last time my body fat was measured, within normal limits 18-24%.

Purchased my first custom made shirt in 1983.

It was the only way to get sleeves long enough and have the rest of the shirt fit correctly.

Custom made shirts back then were less than $100 each.

Now they’re over $200 each.

A few months ago, I met a guy online with whom we share some friends in real life.

He and his partner have a “made-to-measure” shirt company by the name of “Short and Fat.”  It’s a “dot com.”7-15-18-7

Their shirts are $97.00 each.

I was able to pick every feature with their “build-it-yourself” software.

Material, collar, cuffs, fit, pockets or not, pleats in the back, monogram, color of thread for buttonholes. Every design element of the shirt was my choice.

Even the length of the shirt tail. (I can imagine short and fat guys having a problem with “off-the-rack” shirts causing plumber’s crack or a Bellywink TM. Ugh!)

I couldn’t locate my choice of fabric on their website and one of the partners (Blake Adams) helped me via Facebook Messenger to find just what I wanted.

My first shirt arrived and every aspect of it has exceeded my expectations. Color matches the background of my newest suit.IMG_20180715_145756

I picked thread color for the buttonholes to match the lining of the suit.

It has the same features I look for in a top shelf custom made shirt.

Side/body seams and sleeve seams are double stitched.

All fabrics offered are 100% wrinkle resistant Egyptian, Italian & Swiss Cotton.

French cuffs and collar reinforced for durability and a smooth, precise, wrinkle-free finish.

All S&F shirts are made with “non-iron” material. I prefer to iron my shirts and that’s fine, too.

Every shirt comes with free monogramming and an unconditional, “No Bullshirt” 7-15-18-5guarantee.

There are special times and places where I’ll always wear one of the custom made shirts in my wardrobe.

There are many more situations in which I’ll wear my personally designed S&F shirts–even though I’m tall and almost slim.

Thanks to ShortandFat.com, I’ve added “men’s clothes designer” to my resume.

If you’re a dapper dresser, it’s time you did as well.

Book Review: Gentlemen of the Golden Age By Sven Raphael Schneider

How do you feel when you’re wearing your favorite clothes?

How does it make you feel when you attend an event and receive compliments on your attire?

Now put the two together.Cover

Isn’t it great when you receive compliments and you’re dressed in your favorite outfit?

For some of us, that outfit consists of jeans, an oxford button down boasting your favorite college football team, and dark brown penny loafers.

For others, it’s a custom made,double breasted blue suit, French cuffs, subtle cufflinks, and black Allen Edmonds toe cap lace ups. Don’t forget the tie and pocket square.

Clothes make the man?

How about accessories? A nice assortment of pocket squares, neck, and bowties, increases the number of outfits exponentially.

Carly Simon said, “These are the good old days.”

With an awareness of historical fashion and the genealogy of today’s trends in menswear, you can make the present your own “golden age” of gentlemanly attire.

In his book, Gentlemen of the Golden Age, Sven Raphael Schneider offers readers valuable insight and interesting historical facts to enlighten, entertain, and inspire.

What was the “golden age” for men’s fashion? (It wasn’t the roaring twenties.)

Did you know that today’s business suit wasn’t always the preferred attire for executives? (There was no such thing as casual Fridays.)

What’s the difference in a “lounge suit,” a “leisure suit,” and a “travel suit?”Travel Suit

Which is more formal, a single or double breasted jacket?

Who were the pace setters in the States whose influence earned a moniker of its own?

Can you wear white in the winter?

Which men’s magazine started in 1933 and soon became the most influential publication in the menswear industry?

The author provides the answers to these and many more questions in an easy to read conversational style.

While some historical trends are outdated (think corduroy tennis attire!) Schneider says, “…knowing what is historically correct will often make you look more refined.”

Cruise AttireGentlemen of the Golden Age is divided into four sections, each illustrated with classic images from the era by Laurence Fellows. After the introduction, readers are treated to details on suits, combinations, overcoats, and sports/leisure. In the chapter on combinations, we learn how to break the rules and still look smart. Learn which overcoat to buy if you plan to own only one. (It’s important for those who want to look dapper.) In the chapter on sports and leisure I asked myself, “What do you wear when you’re watching L.S.U. football games?” (Seersucker and white bucks of course!)

Do you own a “TV jacket?”

In the end, Mr. Schneider encourages those concerned about “over dressing,” with this reminder, “The point of dressing well is to enjoy it while expressing yourself and your personality.”

Gentlemen of the Golden Age is currently available only as an e-book and is available online, in some cases at no charge.
Interested in learning more of the rules, so you’ll know which ones you want to break, and when it’s alright to do so? Check out Schneider’s site, Gentleman’s Gazette for hundreds of videos and articles. If you’re ready to beef up your wardrobe with attention-getting accessories, check out the offerings of Fort Belvedere HERE.  Posters of Fellows art can be purchased HERE.

If you have more than one necktie in your closet, this book should be on your Kindle, I recommend it enthusiastically.

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(Images used with the written permission of Sven Raphael Schneider.)

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